TrebuchetStore.com - Catapults and Trebuchets - Assembled Models , Kits , Plans and More
Trebuchet  Main Page
Trebuchet Kit
Catapult Plans
Trebuchet Plans
More Project Plans
Trebuchet Kit
Trebuchet Kits
Buying more than one set of plans ?
Try Our Plans Deals
Click Here and Save !

2 Plan Deal
Any 2 Plans
2 Plan Deal
3 Plan Deal
Any 3 Plans
3 Plan Deal
4 Plan Deal
Any 4 Plans
4 Plan Deal

Click Here for More Information
Trebuchet Plans
Highland Trebuchet Plans
Highland Trebuchet Plans
Golf Ball Trebuchet Plans
Golf Ball Trebuchet Plans
Table Top Trebuchet Plans
Table Top Trebuchet Plans
Tennis Ball Trebuchet Plans
Tennis Ball Trebuchet Plans
Stirling Trebuchet Plans
Stirling Trebuchet Plans
DaVinci Trebuchet Plans
DaVinci Trebuchet Plans
Catapult   Plans
Statistical Catapult Plans
 Statistical Catapult Plans
 Roman Artillery Plans
Tabletop Roman Onager Plans
Tabletop Roman Onager Plans
Mangonel Catapult Plans
Mangonel Catapult Plans
More Project Plans
Archimedes Water Screw Plans
Archimedes Water Screw Plans
Assembled Model
Trebuchets
Assembled Model Trebuchets
Siege Warfare
Catapult Design
Catapult Animation
Trebuchet Animation
How to Build a Trebuchet
How to Build a Catapult
Kind Words  From  Our Customers
Have a Question? Please Contact Us
The  Crossbow
Copyright © 2001-08
Gravity Power
TrebuchetStore.com - Catapults and Trebuchets - Assembled Models , Kits , Plans and More

The Crossbow   >   Chapter 50   >   Arrow Throwing   >  p.245

Table of Contents List of Illustrations Index Appendix

Arrow Throwing

with a powerful jerk of the arm cast it forward and high as if throwing a stone, its line of flight being at an angle of 45 degrees to the ground.

Though the movement of the arm in the act of throwing should be chiefly below the top of the shoulder, yet the arrow should be projected upwards as it leaves the hand, G, fig. 176.

If the arrow is inclined to one side or other of the shoulder just as it is thrown, it will only travel an erratic course of a hundred yards or so.

Fig 176. - Arrow Throwing. C and D are half full size.

Fig 176. - Arrow Throwing. C and D are half full size.

As the arrow flies away the knotted end of the string drops off its shaft.

The propelling power is derived entirely from the first finger, which gives the arrow its impetus by pulling sharply against the tightly stretched string as the arm is jerked forward.

The second and third fingers and the thumb merely retain the arrow in position, whilst the first finger exerts the force that propels it.

The difficulty with beginners is, to avoid gripping the arrow between the second and third fingers and the thumb at the moment when it should leave the hand. This, of course, prevents the first finger applying its force to the string, with the result that the flight of the arrow is completely checked.


Table of Contents List of Illustrations <<   Previous Page Next Page   >>


Contact Us Site Index Privacy Policy
RedStoneProjects.com TrebuchetKit.com TrebuchetKits.com
TrebuchetStore.com CatapultStore.com TrebuchetPlan.com
CrossbowBook.com HowToBuildCatapults.com CatapultPlan.com